Should Patients of Hyperthyroidism be made to wait in the Department Post Low-Dose I-131 Therapy?

  • Bhavay Sonik Assistant Professor, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Guru Gobind Singh Medical College and Hospital, Faridkot, Punjab, India.
  • Vijay Pratap Singh M.Sc Student, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Guru Gobind Singh Medical College and Hospital, Faridkot, Punjab, India.
  • Neeraj Sharma Medical Physicist, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Guru Gobind Singh Medical College and Hospital, Faridkot, Punjab, India.
  • Sanjiv Gupta Medical Physicist, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Guru Gobind Singh Medical College and Hospital, Faridkot, Punjab, India.
  • Yasmeen Atwal Senior Resident, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Guru Gobind Singh Medical College and Hospital, Faridkot, Punjab, India.
  • Amandeep Kaur Medical Physicist, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Guru Gobind Singh Medical College and Hospital, Faridkot, Punjab, India.
Keywords: Low-dose I-131 therapy, Hyperthyroidism, Radiation exposure

Abstract

Background: Patients of hyperthyroidism are usually sent home immediately after oral administration of Low Dose Iodine Therapy (LDIT) without taking into account socio-economic conditions, psychological aspects of patients and mode of travel undertaken by patient when going home. These patients may then become a source of unnecessary exposure to family members and general public which comes in the close proximity of the patients. Our study evaluated the minimum time hyperthyroidism patients should be made to wait in the isolation room of the department after LDIT in order to reduce the radiation exposure to family members and general public.

Methods: A total of 51 patients of hyperthyroidism treated with LDIT during the period of Feb 2019–Aug 2020 were included and  divided into two different groups with Group 1 comprising of patients administered 5-15mCi of I-131 and Group 2 comprising of patients administered 16-29mCi of I-131. Radiation exposure rate was measured at 1-meter distance with ionization based survey meter at 5min, 1hour and 2hour post I-131 administration.

Results: Mean radiation exposure rate at 1metre distance for Group 1 at 5min, at 1hour and 2hours was 1.63mR/hr, 1.5mR/hr & 1.35mR/hr respectively whereas for Group 2 it was 3.80mR/hr, 3.60mR/hr & 3.45mR/hr respectively. Significant difference was observed in exposure level taken at 5min, at 1hour and 2hours time interval (p value <0.01). 

Conclusion: Hence, we recommend patient should wait minimum of 2 hours in isolation room of the department post LDIT in order to further reduce radiation exposure to their family members and general public. 

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Published
2021-07-12
How to Cite
1.
Sonik B, Singh VP, Sharma N, Gupta S, Atwal Y, Kaur A. Should Patients of Hyperthyroidism be made to wait in the Department Post Low-Dose I-131 Therapy?. Int Arch BioMed Clin Res [Internet]. 2021Jul.12 [cited 2021Jul.25];7(2):GM4-GM7. Available from: https://iabcr.org/index.php/iabcr/article/view/729
Section
ORIGINAL ARTICLES ~ General Medicine