Retrospective Evaluation of Patients with Xerophthalmia Visited in Hospital

  • Ashok Kumar Jindal Principal Specialist, Department of Ophthalmology, Swatantra Sainani late Dr. Mangal Singh District Hospital, Dholpur, Rajasthan, India.
Keywords: Conjunctival, Ophthalmology, Xeropthalmia.

Abstract

Background: The condition of xeropthalmia refers to the spectrum of ocular manifestations generally because of the vitamin A deficiency. Signs and symptoms include those involving impaired sensitivity of retina to light generally termed as night blindness. In order of their appearance and severity the epithelial disruption of cornea and conjunctiva for example conjunctival xerosis, bitot spots, corneal xerosis and keratomalacia.

Methods: A detailed and elaborated study was conducted in the department ophthalmology, Swatantra Sainani late Dr. Mangal Singh District Hospital, Dholpur, Rajasthan, India. A total of 54 patients were studied and involved in the study over a period of 6 months. All patients were divided into three categories of mild, moderate and severe xeropthalmia. Patients from 13 years to 55 years of age were selected for the study analysis. An informed consent was obtained from each patient or from the guardian. All patients were asked to get a vitamin A test done.

Results: A total of 54 patients so selected for the study analysis, 34 were female (63%) and 20 were male(37%).(Graph1). Accordingtotheclinicalvaluesandseverity23patientswerediagnosedwith mild xeropthalmia with slight difficulty in night vision and clinical values of 0.25-0.30 mg/L, 19 patients were diagnosed with moderate xeropthalmia with values of 0.20-0.24 mg/L and 12 patients were diagnosed with severe xeropthalmia with values of below 0.20mg/L of vitamin A in blood at any given time.

Conclusion: Xeropthalmia can occur in any age group and especially in pre school-age children, adolescents and pregnant women. However, children are at higher risk of vitamin A deficiency and xeropthalmia, owing to their greater vitamin A requirements for growth.

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Published
2018-12-29
How to Cite
1.
Jindal A. Retrospective Evaluation of Patients with Xerophthalmia Visited in Hospital. IABCR [Internet]. 29Dec.2018 [cited 23Jan.2019];4(4):16-8. Available from: https://iabcr.org/index.php/iabcr/article/view/430