Prevalence of Surgical Site Infections in IPD Department of Surgery: A Hospital Based Study

  • Mukesh Garg Assistant Professor, Department of Surgery, Ananta Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Rajsamand
Keywords: Infection, wound, emergency, contaminated, moderate

Abstract

Background: The most common causes of nosocomial infections are surgical site infections (SSIs). It is also reported that SSIs rate ranges from 2.5% to 41.9% worldwide and resulting in high morbidity and mortality.

Methods: This study conducted in Department of Surgery, Ananta Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Rajsamand.

Results: In this study, 410 cases were included, out of which 5.6% were infected post-surgery and 94.3% were non- infected. From the 5.6% cases 60.9% had mild infection and 30.4% had moderate infection and 8.7% had severe infection.

Conclusions: In the present study, the infection rate was higher. This high infection rate was due to the contaminated and dirty procedures where some of the patients were first seen about 2 to 3 days after development of peritonitis. It has been noted that the infection rate was higher in the emergency operative procedures in comparison to the elective procedures.

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Published
2018-09-30
How to Cite
1.
Garg M. Prevalence of Surgical Site Infections in IPD Department of Surgery: A Hospital Based Study. IABCR [Internet]. 30Sep.2018 [cited 11Dec.2018];4(3):73-5. Available from: https://iabcr.org/index.php/iabcr/article/view/408