Exploring Demographic Factors Influencing Acceptance of Family Planning Methods in Aligarh

  • Mohammad Athar Ansari Department of Community Medicine, JN Medical College, AMU, Aligarh-202002
  • Saira Mehnaz Department of Community Medicine, JN Medical College, AMU, Aligarh-202002
  • Ali Jafar Abedi Department of Community Medicine, JN Medical College, AMU, Aligarh-202002
  • Mohammad Salman Shah Department of Community Medicine, JN Medical College, AMU, Aligarh-202002
  • Zulfia Khan Department of Community Medicine, JN Medical College, AMU, Aligarh-202002
Keywords: Felt need, unmet need, family planning methods, demographic factors

Abstract

Introduction: Population of India has jumped to 1,290,974,613 (1.29 billion) on Dec 07, 2015. There are certain demographic factors, which affect the acceptance of family planning methods. Therefore this study was conducted to determine the extent of felt need of family planning methods and to assess the demographic factors influencing the contraceptive acceptance.

Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in J.N. Medical College, AMU, Aligarh, for a period of two and half year. Only the mothers in the post partum period were interviewed. Those mothers who had already accepted family planning methods were not included in the study. 1383 mothers were interviewed. Data were tabulated and analysed using SPSS version 20. Chi-square test (χ2) was applied to know the statistical significance.

Results: Significant number of mothers (39.6%) had planned to adopt family planning methods. Majority of the mothers (71.4%) were in the age group of 21-30 years. In this age group, 39.7% mothers wanted to adopt family methods. As the age of the mothers increased, the acceptance rate also increased. Majority of mothers (52.9%) admitted in the hospital were Hindus. Among Muslims, 40.3 per cent mothers had felt need of family planning methods. Mostly the mothers were illiterate (50.8%). 30.8 per cent of these illiterate mothers wanted to accept family planning methods. Similar felt need (36.4%) was observed in mothers with education up to primary level (V standard). As the birth order increased, felt need also increased.

Conclusion: It may be concluded that significant number of mothers had planned to adopt family planning methods. Though the campaign to promote family planning methods in our country is being carried out, the message should be given more vigorously through information, education and communication (IEC) activities and involvement of non-governmental organisations (NGO). Concerted efforts are needed to find out the reasons for unmet need and its solution

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Published
2015-12-25
How to Cite
1.
Ansari MA, Mehnaz S, Abedi AJ, Shah MS, Khan Z. Exploring Demographic Factors Influencing Acceptance of Family Planning Methods in Aligarh. Int Arch BioMed Clin Res [Internet]. 2015Dec.25 [cited 2019Dec.14];1(2):16-9. Available from: https://iabcr.org/index.php/iabcr/article/view/237
Section
ORIGINAL ARTICLES ~ General Surgery