Indicator Based Assessment of Medicine Storage and Inventory Management Practices in various Public Sector Hospitals of District Srinagar

  • Mir Javid Iqbal Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Kashmir, Hazratbal, Srinagar
  • Mohammad Ishaq Geer Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Kashmir, Hazratbal, Srinagar
  • Parvez Ahamd Dar Department of Paediatrics, Government Medical College Srinagar, Jammu & Kashmir, India
Keywords: Indicator Assessment, Storage Inventory, Stock-out

Abstract

Introduction: The role and relevance of medicines, vaccines and other health supplies are critical, as they are considered important building blocks of the health care system. Well-located, well-built and secured storage facilities are an essential component of a pharmaceutical supply system.

Methodology: This study was carried out at various public sector hospitals of District Srinagar using a set of 138 assessment indicators to study the drug storage and inventory management practices in terms of storage facilities and procedures, inventory and stock management practices and daily, monthly, yearly storage and inventory related activities.

Results: Indicator based assessment for drug storage and inventory management practices revealed highest percentage adherence of 80% in managing expired drugs followed by 55.4% in daily, monthly, yearly storage and inventory control activities, 48% adherence in storage procedures, 46.1% in receiving supplies, 42.5% in stock positioning, 40.9% in storage space, 38% in stock management, 26% in stock-outs and the lowest percentage adherence of 22.9% was observed in inventory management. Facility-wise assessment revealed highest overall percentage adherence of 64.1% at Children’s Hospital (CH) followed by 54.3% at District Hospital (DH), 49.3% at Medical College (MC), 29.6 % at Sub-District Hospital (SDH) and 24.4% at Primary Health Centre (PHC).

Overall percentage availability of indicator medicines was found to be 32.5% (CH=56.2% & DH=18.6%). Stock cards were not found in any of the health care facility and no expired products were found stocked in CH, MC and DH. Average indenting frequency was found to be 31 days (PHC=60; MC=10) whereas average numbers of medicines indented in one go were found to be 24. Average lead time was found to be 15 days (CH=15; MC=60) whereas average no of stock out days was found to be 66.6 days (CH=10 & PHC=115).

Conclusion: Overall adherence towards various storage conditions was found to be less than 50% and lack of adherence to the basic inventory management principles was found to be common

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Published
2015-12-25
How to Cite
1.
Iqbal MJ, Geer MI, Dar PA. Indicator Based Assessment of Medicine Storage and Inventory Management Practices in various Public Sector Hospitals of District Srinagar. Int Arch BioMed Clin Res [Internet]. 2015Dec.25 [cited 2019Oct.17];1(2):8-15. Available from: https://iabcr.org/index.php/iabcr/article/view/236
Section
ORIGINAL ARTICLES ~ General Surgery