A Study of Fungal Isolates in Clinically Diagnosed Patients of Tinea Incognito attending A Tertiary Care Center in Central Uttar Pradesh

  • Aliya Rizvi B.D.S, M.Sc (Medical Microbiology); Department of Microbiology, Integral Institute of Medical Sciences & Research, Integral University, Lucknow
  • Mohammad Asad Haroon MBBS, MD (Dermatology & VD); Associate Professor, Department of Dermatology & VD, Integral Institute of Medical Sciences & Research, Integral University, Lucknow
  • Sanjeev Sahai MBBS, MD (Microbiology); Professor, Department of Microbiology, Mayo Institute of Medical Sciences, Barabanki.
Keywords: Trichophyton, Microsporum, dermatophytosis, steroid

Abstract

Background: Tinea incognito is a dermatophytic infection that lacks the classical features of a typical fungal infection and result from repeated use of immunosuppressive agents like steroids.  The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of fungal isolates among clinically suspected cases of tinea incognito in the dermatology OPD and to study the association between these fungal isolates and type of disease presented.

Methods: One hundred clinically suspected cases of tinea incognito attending the Dermatology OPD of a tertiary care centre were enrolled and were referred to the Department of Microbiology for the isolation and identification of etiological agent. Skin Scrapings were used as specimens for direct microscopic examination after potassium hydroxide (KOH) mounts and remaining specimen was used to inoculate the culture media.

Results: Among the 100 patients, KOH mount demonstrated fungal elements in 85 patients. Sixty two KOH-positive cases and 9 KOH-negative cases showed growth of fungus on culture.  All KOH positive cases except for 2 cases were dermatophytes. Among the total 71 culture positive samples, 86% demonstrated growth of dermatophytes while in the remaining 14% non-dermatophytes were isolated. Trichophyton rubrum was isolated in approximately one-third of the cases. The dermatophytic fungal isolates in decreasing order of occurrence were T. rubrum, T. mentagrophytes, T. tonsurans, T. interdigitale, Microsporum ferrugineum,     M. audouinii and T. schoenleineii.

Conclusions: An increased level of awareness along with better government policies regarding the sales of steroid formulations would prevent mismanagement of tinea cases.

 

 

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Author Biographies

Mohammad Asad Haroon, MBBS, MD (Dermatology & VD); Associate Professor, Department of Dermatology & VD, Integral Institute of Medical Sciences & Research, Integral University, Lucknow

 

 

Sanjeev Sahai, MBBS, MD (Microbiology); Professor, Department of Microbiology, Mayo Institute of Medical Sciences, Barabanki.

 

 

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Published
2020-09-30
How to Cite
1.
Rizvi A, Haroon MA, Sahai S. A Study of Fungal Isolates in Clinically Diagnosed Patients of Tinea Incognito attending A Tertiary Care Center in Central Uttar Pradesh. Int Arch BioMed Clin Res [Internet]. 2020Sep.30 [cited 2020Oct.21];6(3):SD4-SD8. Available from: http://iabcr.org/index.php/iabcr/article/view/619
Section
ORIGINAL ARTICLES ~ Skin & VD