A Study to Assess Thrombocytopenia in High Risk Neonates in a Tertiary Care Hospital: A Prospective Observational Study

  • Saurabh Piparsania Associate Professor, Department of Paediatrics, Index Medical College Hospital & Research Centre, Indore, M.P.
  • Prashant Kumar Choudhary Assistant Professor, Department of Paediatrics, Index Medical College Hospital & Research Centre, Indore, M.P.
  • Priyanka Shrivastava Junior Resident, Department of Paediatrics, Index Medical College Hospital & Research Centre, Indore, M.P.
Keywords: Mild Thrombocytopenia, High Risk Neonates, Neonatal Thrombocytopenia.

Abstract

Background: Thrombocytopenia is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in high risk neonates. The present prospective observational study was conducted to assess incidence of thrombocytopenia in High Risk Neonates in a Tertiary Care Hospital.

Methods: This prospective observational study was carried out at Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of a tertiary care hospital over a period of 6 months. A total of 140 high risk neonates (intramural + extramural) admitted to the NICU during this period formed the study group. Enrolled neonates were observed prospectively. Platelet count of less than 150,000/cu mm was taken as the cut off point for determining thrombocytopenia. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 22.  P value less than 0.05 was considered significant.

Results: In the present study total high risk neonates were 140 in which 63.57% were males and 36.42% were females. The gestational age was normal in 50.71%, moderate to late preterm in 23.57%, very preterm in 17.85%, extreme preterm in 6.42% high risk neonates.  The incidence of thrombocytopenia was 60.71% among the high risk neonates. Mild thrombocytopenia was observed in 16.47% neonates, moderate thrombocytopenia in 34.11% and severe thrombocytopenia in 49.41%.

Conclusions: Our study concluded that incidence of thrombocytopenia was 60.71% among the high-risk neonates. Mild thrombocytopenia was observed in 16.47% neonates, moderate thrombocytopenia in 34.11% and severe thrombocytopenia in 49.41%.

 

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Author Biographies

Saurabh Piparsania, Associate Professor, Department of Paediatrics, Index Medical College Hospital & Research Centre, Indore, M.P.

 

 

Prashant Kumar Choudhary, Assistant Professor, Department of Paediatrics, Index Medical College Hospital & Research Centre, Indore, M.P.

 

 

Priyanka Shrivastava, Junior Resident, Department of Paediatrics, Index Medical College Hospital & Research Centre, Indore, M.P.

 

 

References

1. Izak M, Bussel JB. Management of thrombocytopenia. F1000Prime Rep. 2014;6:45.
2. Veneri D, Franchini M, Randon F, Nichele I, Pizzolo G, Ambrosetti A. Thrombocytopenia: A clinical point of view. Blood Transfusion 2009; 7:75–85.
3. Bussel JB. Thrombocytopenia in newborns, infants and children. Pediatr Ann 1990; 19: 181- 5. 3.
4. Groves A, Kuschel C. NW Newborn Clinical Guideline: Neonatal Thrombocytopenia. Available from: http://www.adhb.govt.nz/newborn/guideline s/Blood/Platelets/NeonatalThrombocytopeni a.htm
5. McCrae KR. Thrombocytopenia in pregnancy. Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program. 2010;2010:397–402.
6. Elvedi-Gasparovic V, Beljan P, Gveric-Ahmetasevic S, Schuster S, Škrablin S. Fetal-maternal complications and their association with gestational thrombocytopenia. Ginekol Pol. 2016;87(6):454–459.
7. Tiller H, Husebekk A, Ahlen MT, Stuge TB, Skogen B. Current perspectives on fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia—increasing clinical concerns and new treatment opportunities. Int J Womens Health. 2017;9:223–234.
8. Van den Akker ES, Oepkes D. Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia. Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol. 2008;22(1):3–14.
9. Roberts I, Murray NA. Neonatal thrombocytopenia. Semin Fetal Neonatal Med. 2008;13(4):256–264.
10. Roberts I, Murray NA. Neonatal thrombocytopenia: causes and management. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2003;88(5):F359–F364.
11. Murray NA, Howarth LJ, McCloy MP, et al. Platelet transfusion in the management of severe thrombocytopenia in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) patients. Transfusion Medicine 2002; 12:35–41. http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.13653148.2002.0 0343.x PMid: 11967135
12. Bhat YR, Cherian CS, Neonatal thrombocytopenia associated with maternal pregnancy induced hypertension, Indian Journal of Pediatrics 2008; 75(6):571-3. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12098-008-0110- x PMid: 18759083
13. Castle V, Andrew M, Kelton J, Giron D, Johnston M, Carter C. Frequency and mechanism of neonatal thrombocytopenia. The Journal of pediatrics. 1986 May 1;108(5):749- 55.
14. Kyoung Hee Choi, Sung Soo Rim, Byung Min Moon, Ki Bok Kim. Study on platelet counts and indices in neonates; Korean J Pediatr (1996) March;39(3) :338-345.
15. Zaccheaus A Jeremiah, Justina E Oburu. Pattern and prevalence of neonatal thrombocytopenia in Port Harcourt, Nigeria; Pathol Lab Med Int. 2010:(2) 27–31.
16. Bolat F, Kılıç SÇ, Oflaz MB, et al. The prevalence and outcomes of thrombocytopenia in a neonatal intensive care unit: a three-year report. Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2012;29(8):710–720.
17. Chakravorty S, Roberts I. How I manage neonatal thrombocytopenia. Br J Haematol. 2012;156(2):155–162.
Published
2020-09-30
How to Cite
1.
Piparsania S, Choudhary PK, Shrivastava P. A Study to Assess Thrombocytopenia in High Risk Neonates in a Tertiary Care Hospital: A Prospective Observational Study. Int Arch BioMed Clin Res [Internet]. 2020Sep.30 [cited 2020Oct.21];6(3):PD6-PD8. Available from: http://iabcr.org/index.php/iabcr/article/view/616
Section
ORIGINAL ARTICLES ~ Paediatrics