Our Experience of Rigid Esophagoscopy for Esophageal Foreign bodies

  • Mohd Azam Haseen Associate Professor, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, JNMC, AMU, Aligarh.
  • Mayank Yadav Assistant Professor, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, JNMC, AMU, Aligarh
  • Sumit Pratap Singh Assistant Professor, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, JNMC, AMU, Aligarh
  • Sayyed Ehtesham Hussain Naqvi Associate Professor, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, GB Pant Hospital, New Delhi
  • Nadeem Raza Assistant Professor, Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, JNMC, AMU, Aligarh
  • M H Beg Professor, Department of General Surgery, F.H. Medical College, Tundla, UP
Keywords: Rigid esophagoscopy, esophageal foreign bodies, flexible endoscopy

Abstract

Background: Foreign body (FB) in esophagus is a common emergency presentation. If not managed properly it can lead to absolute obstruction of esophagus along with other life-threatening complications. Children make up roughly 80% of patients presenting to emergency departments with an esophageal FB.

Methods: Retrospective observational study done in department of Cardiothoracic surgery at J.N. Medical college AMU, Aligarh. We included 308 patients of all age groups after excluding patients with preexisting esophageal diseases. All these patients underwent Rigid esophagoscopy (RE) for retrieval of their FB under General anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation.

Results: There was male preponderance in ratio of 1.5:1 with children younger than 6 years of age comprising 80% of the patients. Upper esophagus (71%) was the favoured site for FB lodgment. The most common FB’s were coins (31.1%) followed by disc batteries (9.1%). Success rate of FB retrieval was 98%. There were no major complications and no mortality in study group.

Conclusions: Our experience of using RE for removal of esophageal FB has been good with no major complications and almost 100 results. Regarding the debate of rigid versus flexible endoscope, we prefer to use rigid esophagoscopy for children and sharp and impacted foreign bodies of any age group and flexible endoscopy for older patients with non-impacted FB. However, a center has to be proficient in both techniques as they are complimentary and very much needed to cater to needs of all variety of esophageal FB’s.

 

 

 

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Author Biographies

Mayank Yadav, Assistant Professor, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, JNMC, AMU, Aligarh

 

 

Sumit Pratap Singh, Assistant Professor, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, JNMC, AMU, Aligarh

 

 

Sayyed Ehtesham Hussain Naqvi, Associate Professor, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, GB Pant Hospital, New Delhi

 

 

Nadeem Raza, Assistant Professor, Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, JNMC, AMU, Aligarh

 

 

M H Beg, Professor, Department of General Surgery, F.H. Medical College, Tundla, UP

 

 

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Published
2020-09-30
How to Cite
1.
Haseen MA, Yadav M, Singh SP, Naqvi SEH, Raza N, Beg MH. Our Experience of Rigid Esophagoscopy for Esophageal Foreign bodies . Int Arch BioMed Clin Res [Internet]. 2020Sep.30 [cited 2020Oct.21];6(3):CS5-CS11. Available from: http://iabcr.org/index.php/iabcr/article/view/612
Section
ORIGINAL ARTICLES ~ Cardiothoracic Surgery