To Study Clinical Profile and Outcome of Dengue Fever with Reference to Serological Test (IgM & NS1) in a Tertiary Care Hospital

  • Jay Dhadke Junior Resident, Department of Paediatrics, Dr. Vaishampayan Memorial Government Medical College, Solapur, Maharashtra, India.
  • Latika Banshiwala Junior Resident, Department of Paediatrics, Seth G. S. Medical College and B. J. Wadia Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.
  • Shakira Savaskar Professor& Head, Department of Paediatrics, Dr. Vaishampayan Memorial Government Medical College, Solapur, Maharashtra, India.
Keywords: Dengue Fever, Serological Markers, Thromobocytopenia.

Abstract

Background: Dengue is the most prevalent viral disease which is mosquito-borne in origin. Incidence of dengue has found to be increased and has become a major public health concern. The aim of the present study was to study clinical profile of dengue in the age group of one year to 14 years and to study certain environmental risk factors of dengue.  Methods: In this prospective clinical study total patient selected were 250 attending in the Outpatient department of Paediatrics of Dr. V. M. Govt. Medical College, Solapur, Maharashtra, India from Sept.2016 to Aug-2018 i.e.2 Years. A detailed case history, a complete physical examination was carried out. The patients were subjected to following routine and special investigations. Clinical grading of disease severity was as done according to WHO guidelines. The data collected was compiled, tabulated, analyzed and subjected to statistical tests done using SPSS. Results: In present study total 7222 were hospitalized and out of 7222 patients 250 tested positive for dengue. Out of which 134 (53.60%) were males and 116 (46.40%) were females. Out of the 250 patients, 83 were aged between 1 to 5 years i.e. 33%, 90 were aged between 6 to 10 years i.e. 36.5%, 77 patients were aged between 11 to 14 years i.e. 30.4%. 100 patients (40%) belonged to urban population and 150 patients (60% ) belonged to rural population. 83 (33%) patients falls in the age group of 1 to 5 years out of which 42 were males and 41 were females. 90 patients were in the age group of 6 to 10 years out of which 50 were males and 40 females. 77 patients belong to the age group 11 to 14 years out of which 40 were males and 37 were females. In the month of Jan to March 42 cases reported i.e. 16.8%, April to June 23 cases were reported i.e. 9.2%, July to September 161 cases were reported i.e. 64.4% and 24 cases in the month of October to December i.e. 9.6%. Out of 250 patients all were having fever (100%) and nausea and vomiting 48 cases (19.5 %) were the least noted symptoms in the study. Out of 250 patient’s pallor was observed in 33 cases (13%), icterus in 10 cases (4%), lymphadenopathy in 5 cases (2%), Epistaxis in 22 cases (8.6%), petechiae in 87 cases (34.7%), malaena in 83 cases (33%), haematuria in 43 cases (17.4%). of 250 hepatomegaly was seen in 49 cases (19.5%), splenomegaly in 43 cases (17.3%), cold peripheral extremities was seen in 38 cases (15.2%), hypotension is seen in 60 (23.9%), mild hypotension in 22 cases (8.8%), moderate hypotension in 25 cases (20%) and severe in 13 cases (5.6%), pleural effusion in 28 cases (11%) and ascites in 25 cases (10 %). Leucopenia was seen in 88 cases (35 %), leucocytosis in 63 cases (25 %), thrombocytopenia in 120 cases (48 %), hyperbilirubinemia in 20 cases (08 %), haematocrit > 42 % in 75 cases (30 %). Out of 250 cases IgM positive was seen maximal in 153 cases (60.8%), only NS 1 was seen in 98 (39.10%), both IgM and NS 1 in 44 (17.3%). 30 cases (12%) were having gall bladder wall oedema, 25 cases (10%) having ascites and 28 case (11%) were having pleural effusion. Conclusions: Our study concluded that out of 7222 patients 250 patients were dengue positive and all were having fever as a predominant symptom. Thrombocytopenia was seen in 120 patients and out of that 24 required platelet rich plasma and only 8 required single donor platelet apheresis. In this study dengue IgM was positive in 153 cases and dengue NS1 was positive in 98 cases which shows that dengue IgM and NS1 are good serological markers of dengue fever.

 

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Author Biographies

Latika Banshiwala, Junior Resident, Department of Paediatrics, Seth G. S. Medical College and B. J. Wadia Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.

 

 

Shakira Savaskar, Professor& Head, Department of Paediatrics, Dr. Vaishampayan Memorial Government Medical College, Solapur, Maharashtra, India.

 

 

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Published
2020-09-30
How to Cite
1.
Dhadke J, Banshiwala L, Savaskar S. To Study Clinical Profile and Outcome of Dengue Fever with Reference to Serological Test (IgM & NS1) in a Tertiary Care Hospital. Int Arch BioMed Clin Res [Internet]. 2020Sep.30 [cited 2020Oct.21];6(3):PD1-PD5. Available from: http://iabcr.org/index.php/iabcr/article/view/606
Section
ORIGINAL ARTICLES ~ Paediatrics