A Study on Clinical and Microscopic Correlation: A Comparative Hospital Based Study of Vaginal Discharge in Reproductive Age Group

  • Anuradha Kakkar Assistant Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Rohilkhand Medical College and Hospital, Bareilly
  • Tilak Raj Kakkar Assistant Professor, Department of General Surgery, Rohilkhand Medical College and Hospital, Bareilly
Keywords: Bacterial vaginosis, vaginal discharge, Lactobacilli

Abstract

Background: Its prevalence among the females of reproductive age group is estimated to be 30% in India. Vaginitis is an ancient disease; this disease. It has been estimated that around 14% of women in the reproductive age group suffer from vaginitis and it accounts for 5-10 million OPD visits per year worldwide.

Methods: 200 cases with vaginal discharge were included in this study. The duration of study was over a period of one year. This study was conducted in Department of Gynaecology.

Results: In this study we were included 200 cases of vaginal discharge. Among all cases 146 cases get infected & 54 cases had physiological vaginal discharge. Among 146 cases, 34.5% cases got mixed infection, 21.5% bacterial vaginosis, 15.5% cases vulvovaginal candidiasis & 1.5% Trichomonas vaginalis.

Conclusions: It can be concluding that Bacterial vaginosis is the most common single infection followed by candidiasis and trichomonas vaginalis. Some cases of mixed infections were also diagnosed.

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Published
2019-12-24
How to Cite
1.
Kakkar A, Kakkar TR. A Study on Clinical and Microscopic Correlation: A Comparative Hospital Based Study of Vaginal Discharge in Reproductive Age Group. Int Arch BioMed Clin Res [Internet]. 2019Dec.24 [cited 2020Apr.1];5(4):OG3-OG5. Available from: http://iabcr.org/index.php/iabcr/article/view/558
Section
ORIGINAL ARTICLES ~ Obstetrics & Gynaecology