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ORIGINAL ARTICLE

10.21276/iabcr.2017.3.2.20
Bacteriological Profile and Antibiogram of Gram Negative Bacteria Isolated from Blood Culture
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April-June 2017 | Vol 3 | Issue 2 | Page :91-95

Bhavna Bhadauria1*,Umar Farooq2,Sudhir Singh 3,Neha Dayal1,Saman Mashkoor1 ,Divyaansh Sridhar1

1Post graduate student, 2Professor and Head, 3Assistant professor Department of Microbiology, TMMC & RC, TMU Moradabad,

How to cite this article: Bhadauria B, Farooq U, Singh S, Dayal N, Mashkoor S, Sridhar D. Bacteriological Profile and Antibiogram of Gram Negative Bacteria Isolated from Blood Culture. Int Arch BioMed Clin Res. 2017;3(2):91-95.DOI:10.21276/iabcr.2017.3.2.20

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Blood stream infections are one of the important cause of morbidity and mortality all over the world. Bacteraemia ranges from self-limiting infections to life-threatening septicaemia that requires rapid and aggressive antimicrobial treatment. The mortality rate ranges from 20% to 50% in cases of bacteraemia infections. Aim and Objective: The present study was undertaken to know the profile of gram negative organism causing bacteraemia with their Antibiogram from suspected cases. Material and Method: During a one-year period, 400 blood samples were taken from bacteraemia suspected patients. Blood culture was done by using BacT/Alert 3D system. Further identification of organism was done by different biochemical test. Antimicrobial sensitivity pattern was determined by Kirby Bauer Disc Diffusion method according to CLSI guidelines. Result: Out of 400 samples, the total number of culture positive cases were found to be 131 giving culture positive rate of 32.75%. Gram positive organism were more than gram negative organism, constituting about 75 (57.69%) of total isolates. 56(42.74%) Gram negative organism were isolated in this study. Most frequent pathogen identified among gram negative bacteria were Klebseilla 24(42.8%), followed by E. coli 18(32.14%), Acinetobacter 10(17.85%), Pseudomonas 2(3.57%) and Salmonella 2(3.57%) respectively. Isolated gram negative organism was highly sensitive to Polymyxin B 51(91.07%). After Polymyxin B isolated gram negative bacteria show high sensitivity for Levofloxacin(60.71%), Cefixime (57.78%), Gentamicin, Meropenem, Piperacillin/tazobactum (50%), Cefepime (44.64%) with least sensitivity for Ampicillin/Sulbactum (14.28%). Conclusion: The present study provides information about gram negative pathogens responsible for blood stream infection along with their sensitivity towards commonly used antimicrobial. Antibiotic sensitivity pattern of isolates provides useful guidelines to clinicians in initiating empiric therapy and help in management of blood stream infections.

Keywords: Blood stream infections, Blood culture, Antibiotic sensitivity pattern.

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