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ORIGINAL ARTICLE

10.21276/iabcr.2017.3.2.13
Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity and Its Possible Associations among School Adolescents in Urban Kanpur
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April-June 2017 | Vol 3 | Issue 2 | Page : 58-61

Pankaj Biswas1*, Anju Gahlot2, Saif Anees 3

1PG;2Professor & Head;3Assistant Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Rama medical College, Mandhana, Kanpur, UP, India.

How to cite this article: Biswas P, Gahlot A, Anees S. Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity and Its Possible Associations among School Adolescents in Urban Kanpur. Int Arch BioMed Clin Res. 2017;3(2):58-61.DOI:10.21276/iabcr.2017.3.2.13

ABSTRACT

Background: Obesity is becoming a worldwide problem affecting all levels of society and is thus being described as a global epidemic. the highest rates of childhood obesity have been observed in the developed countries, its prevalence is increasing in the developing countries also. 50-80% of obese children will continue as obese adults. Aims and Objective: To study prevalence and possible associations of obesity and overweight among school adolescents in urban Kanpur. Methods: A cross-sectional study done among 468 children from 7-10 class. Complete data of each child were collected using a pre-designed, pre-tested questionnaire. Measurement of height & weight will be done using standard procedure with measuring tape (made of non-stretchable steel) & electronic weighing machine respectively. Body mass index(BMI) will be calculated using the formula: WEIGHT (in kg)/HEIGHT (in m sq.) Sex & age specific percentile cut-points (85th percentile for overweight & 95th percentile for obesity) of a reference population according to BMI for Age Classification by CDC will be used. Data will be entered in Microsoft Excel & will be analysed using SPSS software. Results: Prevalence of overweight was 13.6% while prevalence of obesity was 2.9%. Overweight and Obesity was found significantly higher in Children of 5-10 years’ age group, with family H/O obesity, not playing outdoor games, not doing regular exercise, watching TV, Computer more than 2 hours daily and consuming junk food regularly. Conclusions: Periodic screening for overweight and obesity should be done in schools followed by counselling of parents of overweight and obese children. Counselling of adolescent children on lifestyle modification should be emphasized.

Keywords: Adolescent, Body Mass Index (BMI), Overweight, Obesity.

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